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Hul-Qumi-Num in 2006. Opening speaker Chief Robert Morales treaty negotiations.. Nanaimo. B-roll footage of First Nation band representatives from all over British Columbia, Canada. The Road to Self-Determination The treaty process is an opportunity for the Hul'qumi'num people to officially secure recognition of the aboriginal title and rights... click for more    (ID • 1834)

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treaty negotiations nanaimo first nations aboriginal people injustice recognition traditional lands resources elders self determination education conflict politics social hul qumi num robert morales www.realworldtelevision.com kelowna cameraman gary moore photojournalism www.realworldphotographs.com www.garymoorephotography.com okanagan videographer stock video archive www.realworldimage.com
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treaty negotiations nanaimo first nations aboriginal people injustice recognition traditional lands resources elders self determination education conflict politics social hul qumi num robert morales www.realworldtelevision.com kelowna cameraman gary moore photojournalism www.realworldphotographs.com www.garymoorephotography.com okanagan videographer stock video archive www.realworldimage.com
Hul-Qumi-Num in 2006. Opening speaker Chief Robert Morales treaty negotiations.. Nanaimo. B-roll footage of First Nation band representatives from all over British Columbia, Canada. The Road to Self-Determination The treaty process is an opportunity for the Hul'qumi'num people to officially secure recognition of the aboriginal title and rights, and to shape the destiny within British Columbia and Canada. Establishing a treaty that pleases everyone will not be without challenges, but by joining together, the six Nations of the Hul'qumi'num Treaty Group are strongly positioned to meet these challenges, both during negotiations and after a treaty is signed. By securing recognition of title to their traditional lands and regaining control over their resources, we can work toward building healthy, productive and sustainable communities for Aboriginal people — today and in the years to come. Hands are raised to all the community members, elders and leaders who have participated in these working groups and given excellent advice and guidance in the mandate of getting to 100 per cent. It is through our efforts together that they will reach a fair and just treaty. "We are engaging in a process as treaty tables in British Columbia that we believe will result in an ability to move forward in an united way, and hopefully in a way that will lead us to a successful conclusion. Today we have representatives, cheifs, councils, from 41 treaty tables representing 40 communities. We have been minute over the last year and wondering why we cannot make progress in the treaty negotiations. We have identified 6 areas of major concern. We have identified 6 policies or mandates that the Provincial and Federal government are putting forward are leading to impasses and are creating a situation where we are unable to conclude a negotiated settlement in these key areas. The negotiations have stalled because the government have predetermined the outcomes and have taken a positional type of bargaining and are not prepared to truly negotiate with us. We say that these negotiations should be built on good faith and are about the reconciliation between First Nations and other Canadians and British Columbians and is therefore necessary for all parties to come to an agreement that is in all our best interests and will be able to move us for unitedly in this province and so we come together today to sign a protocol that says we are committed to working together and work in a united fashion, to be able to put our ideas and energies together to achieve lasting and sustainable treaties in this province. The six ares we are currently finding difficult areas with the negotiations are these: The first area is uncertainty and here government comes to the table and says we must extinguish the rights we have in our traditional territory in exchange for land that will be part of our treaty settlement lands. We find that is a position that is unacceptable, we need to be able to have a continuing role in our traditional territories and we want to sit down and talk to government about what that role will be. In terms of of Governance we are looking at a model that has been put forward that is called concurrent jurisdiction and what that means is that all provincial and federal laws will apply to First Nations lands and in the treaty we will negotiate law making authorities for First Nation governments but those laws will exist concurrently with the laws of British Columbia and Canada and it is only in the event of a conflict will the treaty be able to determine which law will take priority and we say that that could lead to some very difficult jurisdictional questions. As well that we need to be flexible with the type of government the First Nations want to put into place, we recognize that our governments need to be democratic but there are communities that have hereditary systems that have existed for generations and they are in fact democratic and they have been able to stand the test of time. The Road to Self-Determination (Courtesy of www.hulquminum.bc.ca) The treaty process is an opportunity for the Hul'qumi'num people to officially secure recognition of our aboriginal title and rights, and to shape our destiny within British Columbia and Canada. Establishing a treaty that pleases everyone will not be without challenges, but by joining together, the six Nations of the Hul'qumi'num Treaty Group are strongly positioned to meet these challenges, both during negotiations and after a treaty is signed. By securing recognition of title to our traditional lands and regaining control over our resources, we can work toward building healthy, productive and sustainable communities for our people — today and in the years to come. We raise our hands to all the community members, elders and leaders who have participated in these working groups and given us excellent advice and guidance in our mandate of getting to 100 per cent. It is through our efforts together that we will reach a fair and just treaty. In terms of the fiscal relations that we will have in a post treaty world. The Canadian government says we must have our own source revenue, which in principal we agree, First Nations communities do need to contribute to social programs, but the way it's been put forward is that if First Nations make a dollar 50 cents of that can be clawed back by government and taken out of health or education or other transfer dollars that are being afforded to our communities at the present time. That will result in a position we will not be able to move out of the current state of poverty and the current state of social inequality. In terms of taxation, the government says that we must relinquish the current tax exemptions that we have and there are many communities that feel very strongly about that gain recognize that maybe one day would be recognizable to our communities but given the current economic state of our communities it is difficult to see how people already living in poverty would be called upon to fully engage in a tax system. We want to negotiate the circumstances and how that would come into effect and lastly in terms of the fishery. The First Nations has relied upon the fisheries for many generations on the west coast in the time of Douglas, Governor Douglas who recognized our communities sustained ourselves from the ocean and that was the rational for these small reserves. So we must have a strong position in terms of allocation, in terms of co-management. We need to be able to sit with government and discuss these mandates in a meaningful way and we are calling upon the Government of Canada and British Columbia to engage in a process with us, to be able to engage at a negotiation table that really looks at social policy and that we are able to critically analyze those and to go through a process of determining the underlying rational and the underpinnings for the positions that our government is bringing forward and to see what First Nations would like to see as a result of treaties. We see that treaties need to lead to sustainable communities, that treaties need to improve the lives of all of our members and that treaties are being looked at as the way that we will truly be able to become full participants in Canada and British Columbia, to be able to have the economic and social benefits and be able to pull ourselves out from the current state that many communities find themselves. Those are the underpinnings and the reasons the tables have to come together and we anticipate that we will have more tables that will join and be part of this process to unitedly put our ideas forward. We will no longer work at separate tables independently of each other on these key areas. If we are not successful in this approach then we are also resolved to fully implement our rights and title, to begin to become much more assertive in the rights that we currently have and to be able to fully engage in that process. I hope that we can reach a fair and just resolution that we can enter into negotiations that are conciliatory and co-operative and hopefully reach the kind of relationship we need here in British Columbia. We realize that then premier of this province is encouraging a new relationship and we also look forward to a new relationship and these treaties are where we will fully develop and be able to take full from and effect."
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